Wittenborg University News

Subscribe to Wittenborg University News feed
Wittenborg University News
Updated: 3 hours 29 min ago

Wittenborg University IBA students to get additional internationally recognized NIMA B Certificates!

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 18:10
Language English

As of this week Wittenborg University can add another feather to its cap – it has today signed an agreement to become an Education Partner with the Netherlands Institute for Marketing (NIMA), which is the professional association and exam institute in the field of marketing. Wittenborg University’s IBA programmes in Economics & Management, Marketing & Communication & Hospitality Management have been awarded a NIMA accreditation for the marketing modules in the bachelor degree programme. The accreditation was awarded from 1 August 2014.

The NIMA accreditation of the programmes was a joint effort; Wittenborg worked together with its NRTO partner TMO Fashion Business School in Doorn, to achieve this agreement, first in Dutch higher education.

Wittenborg Director, Peter Birdsall, who signed the agreement this afternoon at TMO Fashion Business School’s campus in Doorn, said: “NIMA has a great reputation in the Netherlands as a quality stamp for marketing professionals and internationally they are developing their marketing qualifications. Wittenborg University, with its 400 students representing 60 different nationalities, can now provide students with an extra quality benchmark as well as promoting business and management around the world.”

Birdsall also commented on the collaboration with the Fashion Business School, “Wittenborg and TMO have had a friendly relationship for a few years now, however this jointly achieved agreement with NIMA marks the start of a more closer relationship in the development of programmes and education partnerships between our two institutes.”

Partnering with NIMA provides an industry certification of marketing and Wittenborg’s marketing content has been validated as equivalent to NIMA B1. The screening of module content and the sharing of knowledge with lecturers are key elements of the Education Partnership.

For students the certification, which is an independent mark of skills quality, distinguishes them as having attained a certain level of quality education in the field of marketing.

Marketing is a key element in business management and all Wittenborg’s International Business Administration (IBA) programmes incorporates marketing modules from Phase 1 to Phase 3. These includes subjects such as Modern Principles of Marketing, Strategic Marketing, Marketing Research and Marketing Mix.  Additional emphasis are placed on principles of the field for students following the IBA in Marketing & Communication.  

NIMA is a member of the European Marketing Confederation (EMC) and its exams are internationally accredited by the EMC against the European Qualification Framework.

Wittenborg University's Bachelor IBA programmes are nationally accredited by the German, Austrian & Swiss FIBAA and the Dutch and Belgian NVAO.

WUP 21/11/2014 

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Links:

NIMA http://www.nima.nl/english

TMO Fashion Business School

 

 

Related Content: NIMAMarketingMBAIBAFIBAATickerText: Wittenborg IBA students to get additional internationally recognized NIMA B Certificates!

Minister of Education Jet Bussemaker in debate with non-funded and private higher education sector.

Thu, 11/20/2014 - 22:07
Language English

On Wednesday, Dutch education Minister, Jet Bussemaker, paid a visit to two private universities of applied science in the Netherlands, TMO - the Fashion Business School on Doorn and IVA, the Automotive Business School in Driebergen. Both institutes offer highly acclaimed and small scale higher education to Dutch students. 

At the end of her visit, Bussemaker was invited to join a debate and forum hosted at IVA by the Netherlands Association of Private Higher Education Institutes (NRTO), to which many policy makers and board members from other private higher education institutes were also invited.

The debate was lively and balanced with the private schools asking the minister to consider the areas in which a better level playing field (in relation to funded higher education institutes) could be conceived. Issues were raised such as equal access to specific types of scholarship programmes, such as those for international students, and Wittenborg, represented by its director of education, Peter Birdsall, and chief policy advisor Karen Penninga, argued that international students and Dutch students should have equal access to all sorts and types of additional support, notwithstanding whether they attend a private or a publicly supported University in the Netherlands.

In her answers to the sometimes quite straightforward questions fired at her, Bussemaker showed her extensive knowledge and understanding of the issues surrounding Dutch higher education, and praised the private providers for the initiatives and in some cases best practice scenarios – for instance in forging relationships with publicly funded institutes, such as Wittenborg’s new accreditation cluster for the board bachelor IBA.

However, the minister also made it clear that there were serious difficulties in achieving a level playing field across higher education types in the Netherlands, especially due to the historical development and tradition of the past 25 years in Dutch HE. Indirectly she also referred to the difficult in appeasing all parties, such as the association of public universities of applied sciences, formally known as the HBO Raad.

The NRTO presented a list of 10 points which it requested the minister to sincerely consider implementing in order to create a level playing field in Dutch Higher Education. These included, the introduction of vouchers for part-time Dutch students allowing them to study at any accredited institution they wish, and flexible learning concepts in higher education (i.e a relaxation of the EC Credit / hour norm for adult learners).

Especially important for Wittenborg were the level playing field in student scholarships and the teacher scholarship programme, giving trainee teachers at Wittenborg possible access to Master programme funding. Also, the equivalence of a programme accreditation to institution accreditation for small Universities was requested.

Finally, the NRTO asked the minister to look at changing the whole policy with regard to the status of funded and non-funded universities in the Netherlands and the inequalities in that respect.

A final question was “how does a private University become a funded University – what is the procedure?”. The answer from the senior ministry officials, - the minister couldn’t answer ‘ was that there wasn’t one! An unanswered question was “are there private institutions that actually want to be come funded?”.

WUP 19/11/2014

Related Content: Minister BussemakerStaatssecretaris ZijlstraMinisterie van OnderwijsTickerText: Minister of Education Jet Bussemaker in debate with non-funded and private higher education sector.

Open Evenings at Wittenborg University

Mon, 11/17/2014 - 20:51
Language English

Calling all prospective students! Mid-autumn means it is time again for the NXTLVL Open Evenings which will be held in Apeldoorn this week. 

The Open Evenings are an opportunity for Dutch institutes of higher education, like Wittenborg University, to showcase what they offer potential students while the students get information which will help them choose where to continue their studies. The annual event is held at the Aventus college building in Apeldoorn, that it shares with Wittenborg. It kicked off on Monday and will continue until Thursday, the 20th of November.

On Tuesday, the 18th of November (tomorrow) between 18:00 and 21:20 Wittenborg, an international university boasting students and staff from about 60 nationalities, will give potential students a pre-taste of its International Business Adminstration (Bachelor) programmes such as International Hospitality Management as well as Small Business & Entrepreneurship.

Besides Wittenborg, institutes from all over Holland - as far as Amsterdam and Groningen in the north, will take part in the exhibitions which will see them share a communal “market place” where each will have a stall and learners can obtain information about the individual schools for further education.

Wittenborg admission and communication staff will be out in full force on Tuesday evening to provide information to the many interested learners and their parents in the Main Hall of the Aventus Building.

During the evening, two detailed sessions will be held by Wittenborg director, Peter Birdsall, and hospitality lecturer, Esther Gitonga, on the the many different bachelor programs offered by the university. Last year more than a hundred learners attended the sessions

On Thursday, the 20th of November, the open evening will focus on master-programmes. Wittenborg currently offers three Master of Science programmes: the MSc in International Hospitality Management, the MSc in International Event Management and an MSc in International Tourism Management.

Application is also open for the university’s new Master of Business Administration (MBA) which will start in February 2015.

Throughout the year, Wittenborg invites interested students to contact its admissions department at admission@wittenborg.eu for information and to arrange a try-out lesson day, organized 6 times a year. Wittenborg’s Bachelor programmes have 6 entry dates a year and there is no 1st May deadline for application at Wittenborg University!

WUP 17/11/2014

 

Related Content: Open EveningOpen AvondTickerText: Open Evenings at Wittenborg University

Holland! Keep your embassies open in Africa!

Sun, 11/16/2014 - 22:15
Language English

The Netherlands African Business Council (NABC) has urged the Dutch government not to close any more embassies in Africa.

The NABC’s business services manager, Thijs Rutgers, made the appeal at Wittenborg University’s African Business-to-Business Event last week. Rutgers was the keynote speaker at the event. Other speakers included Rabobank’s Africa Desk manager, Peter Niekus, and Gonneke Campen, a representative of Young Africa, a non-profit organization doing skills training in Africa.

In the past two years Dutch embassies and consulates have closed in Eritrea (Asmara), Cameroon (Yaoundé), Benin (Cotonou), Zambia (Lusaka) and Burkina Faso (Ouagadougou).

“There are now 21 Dutch embassies in Africa and counting…” Rutgers said. According to him this does not compare favorably with other countries such as China (49 embassies in Africa), the US (49), France (47), Germany (43), the UK (37), Brazil (34), Japan (34), Turkey (33), Spain (38) and India (28).

“We have heard they (the government) are even considering closing the embassy in Senegal. We have to open embassies and support businesses and charities operating there,” Rutgers said. When asked by Wittenborg senior lecturer, Karin Pelle, about possible reasons behind the closures, Rutgers said he is not entirely sure, but it might have something to do with cutting costs.

Wittenborg University has continuously had a steady flow of students from Africa following its Bachelor of Administration and Master of Science degrees. Currently it hosts 45 students from 14 different African countries.

With the event the university hoped to spark awareness of the potential and possibilities the African market has to offer. It was attended by scores of African students, Dutch companies interested in doing business abroad, academics and representatives of charity organizations.

The purpose of the event was to highlight business opportunities in Africa, current economic trends and lucrative regions and sectors on the continent. It also sought to provide a networking platform for both established and prospective Dutch companies in Africa, the non-profit sector, training institutes and international students.

Niekus said Africa is one of the richest continents, citing South Africa which is the world’s largest platinum producer (75%), Nigeria who is ranked 11th when it comes to oil production and East Africa with its vast gas reserves.

According to Niekus the three top sectors for business opportunities are in Logistics, Food and Agriculture as well as Energy. He also said when Dutch-ambassadors was asked to list the top African countries to do business in the list included Kenya, South Africa, Ethiopia, Ghana and Tanzania.  He further emphasized that although challenges remain, there are far less conflict than 20 years ago.

Rutgers also criticized the Hogeschool of Amsterdam for banning students and staff to undertake any study or work related trips to Africa in the next two years citing the outbreak of viruses such as Ebola and political instability as the reasons behind the decision.

Source: Nuffic

WUP 16/11/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: AfricaMBATickerText: Holland! Keep you embassies open in Africa!

An Apprentice Style Project Week

Thu, 11/13/2014 - 15:54
Language English

In a manner that might even impress Sir Alan Sugar of the BBC’s Apprentice programme, there were some frantic last-minute business dealings last Friday afternoon as Wittenborg Bachelor of Business Administration students competed in groups against each other for the crown of best company - only, this was in cyberspace.

The contest was part of Project Week, which this November for the second time was managed by visiting professor James Bowen from the University of Ottawa. Friday it was second-phase students competing against each other in an online business simulation game and Thursday first year students.

Bowen is part of a team of international developers Wittenborg University has been working with since 2012 to create the world’s first gaming-based higher education learning curriculum – an MBA in which students do their learning within game-based simulations.

The simulation tests students on their entrepreneurial capabilities in areas including investment, hiring and firing, venture capital, risk management, product development and supply chain management.

It the end it was team Driessen-Driessen who time and again came out tops. Their prize? Lots of chocolates and cookies – all the way from Canada!

For the losing teams: Better luck next time!

What is a gamefied MBA exactly?

Bowen explains it in this way: “A gamefied MBA is the use of simulations or games as a way of teaching and practicing the material and concepts in a business-environment. A traditional MBA student would attend lectures and they may use cases or do presentations and reports. With a gamefied MBA, what we want is the for the students to develop some understanding of a topic area and then directly practice that in a simulation or a game. The great thing about simulations and games is that the learning objectives are well-defined. We know exactly what we are going to learn in a game and we can measure that very precisely. So what I saw was that students in the learning environment are really bored. When someone stands up there and lectures for three hours... that old-school assembly-line kind of approach just doesn’t work with the new generation.”

WUP 12/11/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: Gamified MBAProject WeeksTickerText: An Apprentice Style Project Week

Africa Event 2014 a great success!

Fri, 11/07/2014 - 16:53
Language English

WUP 7/11/2014 – Africa Event 2014 a great success! - From excellent speakers, an engaging audience and an African dance group that had everyone on their feet - all-in-all, Wittenborg University’s African Business-to-Business Event was a raging success last night. The event was attended by a number of business people from Dutch and African companies, charity organizations doing empowerment work in Africa and droves of students, eager to establish contacts in the business world.

Speakers included Peter Niekus (manager of Rabobank’s Africa Desk), Thijs Rutgers (business service manager of the Netherlands African Business Council), Gonneke Campen from Young Africa, prof Adri Vermeer from the Tjommie Foundation and Wittenborg final-phase student Ishebo Twijukye, who delivered an engaging talk on his internship at an international company,  Bredenoord.

The purpose of the event was to highlight business opportunities in Africa, current economic trends and lucrative regions and sectors on the continent. It also sought to provide a networking platform for both established and prospective Dutch companies in Africa, the non-profit sector, training institutes and international students.

Wittenborg director, Peter Birdsall, kicked off proceedings with an introduction to the event. He was followed by Peter Niekus from Rabobank.  Niekus said Africa is one of the richest continents, citing South Africa which is the world’s largest platinum producer (75%), Nigeria who is ranked 11th when it comes to oil production and East Africa with its vast gas reserves.

According to Niekus the three top sectors for business opportunities are in Logistics, Food and Agriculture as well as Energy. He also said when Dutch-ambassadors was asked to list the top African countries to do business in the list included Kenya, South Africa, Ethiopia, Ghana and Tanzania.  He further emphasized that although challenges remain, there are far less conflict than 20 years ago.

Gonneke Campen from Young Africa says the organization has a presence in three African countries where they have established five skills training centers and have already trained 25 000 youngsters in professional skills. “I think we will need Africa in the future, because our population is decreasing there will be skills shortages in sectors like health care.”

Ishebo Twijukye said Africa is the fastest growing continent in the world. “Now is the time for people to wake up and invest their resources in Africa. If you don’t do it now, it will be too late.” He also urged international companies to make use of international students and graduates for research purposes and as potential employees. “They have knowledge of the areas (you wish to invest in), it can ease barriers like language and they probably already have an established network of contacts.” Twijukye did research for Bredenoord around the possibilities of entering the Tanzanian market.

Thijis Rutgers said the Netherlands African Business Council (NABC) has an extensive and diverse network of about 350 Dutch companies who are currently active in Africa and another 50 African companies it also has links with. He said he disagreed with Niekus’ list of top African countries to do business in the sense that Nigeria also belongs on the list. “There are plenty of opportunities – the risks are high, but the returns are also high.”

Speakers also had to field questions from the audience. Tonia Dabwe, who is the founder of So Venture, wanted to know from Campen how Young Africa reduces the risk of corruption in their activities. Campen said the organization has a zero-tolerance policy when it comes to corruption and build their centers from scratch, collaborate with local governments and screen those involved in the building and maintaining of the centers thoroughly. “Not all people working for the government are bad people.”

The evening was rounded off with an energetic performance by an African drum-and-dance group who after their performance managed to convince several members of the audience to showcase their dance skills!

WUP 7/11/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: AfricaThe International ClassroomMBAMscTickerText: Africa Event 2014 a great success!

“Faster and more intense.”

Thu, 11/06/2014 - 12:02
Language English

This is how visiting professor James Bowen PhD from the University of Ottawa described the second online game-based simulation session he is teaching at Wittenborg University as part of Project Week this week. The first one, with 80 students, was a year ago when the idea was tested on first and second year bachelor administration students.

Since 2012, Wittenborg University has been working with a team of international developers to create the world’s first gaming-based higher education learning curriculum – an MBA in which students do their learning within game-based simulations.

What is a gamefied-MBA exactly?

Bowen explains it as follows: “A gamefied MBA is the use of simulations or games as a way of teaching and practicing the material and concepts in a business-environment. A traditional MBA student would attend lectures and they may use cases or do presentations and reports. With a gamefied MBA, what we want is the for the students to develop some understanding of a topic area and then directly practice that in a simulation or a game. The great thing about simulations and games is that the learning objectives are well-defined. We know exactly what we are going to learn in a game and we can measure that very precisely. So what I saw was that students in the learning environment are really bored. When someone stands up there and lectures for three hours... that old-school assembly-line kind of approach just doesn’t work with the new generation.”

Today about first-year students got to try out the simulation game in a two-hour session. Tomorrow it will be the turn of the second-year students in a three-hour session. Approximately the same number of students will take part this year as last year.

The simulation tested students on their entrepreneurial capabilities in areas including investment, hiring and firing, venture capital, risk management, product development and supply chain management. Teams of students will compete for prizes.

According to Bowen not much has changed in presenting the simulation game to students between this year and last year. “But it is faster and more intense. Last year we combined the first and second and first year students but that didn’t work out so well this year.

WUP 6/11/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: Gamified MBAMBATickerText: “Faster and more intense.”

Wittenborg University can provide paid research projects for international students in collaboration with Dutch companies.

Sun, 11/02/2014 - 21:48
Language English

A recent example of this is two African students from Wittenborg who recently completed research assignments for local company, DUBOS B.V. that currently imports wood from Romania. The two Wittenborg students, Agnes Dzomo and Serge Gwabene, researched whether there is a possible market in the Netherlands and Belgium for the company to also import organic forest fruit like berries and wild mushrooms from Romania.

Both students will be attending Wittenborg’s African Business-to-Business Event on Thursday, the 6th of November 2014, which will provide a platform for Dutch companies interested in expanding their business to Africa and to network with other companies and stakeholders in Africa. The event will also seek to highlight the economic opportunities and potential of the continent.

The students were supervised by the head of Wittenborg’s Research Centre, Dr Teun Wolters.

Agnes, from Cameroon, who speaks fluent French and English assisted with the project as part of her internship module.  “It’s a company run by two Dutch entrepreneurs who are just starting out with the idea. I got the job through Wittenborg itself, that helps students find internships. My job was to investigate the current organic market in the Netherlands and determine whether there is space for a new entrant. I believe the company was happy with my work and it has since found a distributor through which to sell their products. All in all, I enjoyed the work.”

Serge, from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focused on market access regulation and profiling prospective customers and distributors. “It was challenging because it was very difficult to get updated data and there were many constraints financially in getting primary data,” he said.

He will use the experience at DUBOS to complete his graduation assignment.

The website for the project is www.dubosplus.nl

WUP 1/11/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: Work PlacementAfricaTickerText: Wittenborg University can provide paid research projects for international students in collaboration with Dutch companies.

EuroBA steering group meets at Ecole de Savignac, France

Wed, 10/29/2014 - 21:20
Language English

The EuroBA is a unique international hospitality management bachelor programme that sees its students study in 3 different European countries during the course of 3 years. Wittenborg currently has 5 students studying their 2nd year at Angell Academy in Freiburg, Germany and 7 1st year students in Apeldoorn. The programme currently has more than 100 students studying in 5 different countries.

The EuroBA steering group met at the location of the Ecole de Savignac, based in the small French village of Savignac, around 150 kilometres inland from Bordeaux. The school has an excellent reputation in the hospitality industry, both inside France and around the world. Its 400 plus students come from all over France, and it boasts a strong international team of teaching staff. Wittenborg was represented at the meetings by Euroba coordinator Esther Gitonga and Director of Education, Peter Birdsall.

During its two-day meetings, the steering group of the The European Academy of Hospitality Management consortium discussed the planning and development of the programme, which allows students to study for half a year at the University of Brighton in their final year before returning to their “parent” institution for the graduation phase. For students at Wittenborg, this means the possibility of completing both their Dutch and their UK degrees.

Currently, students following the EuroBA at Wittenborg are able to spend semester 1 of year to at the Angell Academy in Freiburg, before completing a 1 semester work placement. In year 3 they spend a semester at the University of Brighton, before returning to Wittenborg to complete their graduation phase. Only students who can speak French can choose for Savignac in their 2nd year, however at the Centro Superior de Hosteleria Galicia, in Spain, 2nd year modules are taught in English, making this an option.

For more information on the programme, email euroba@wittenborg.eu .

WUP 28/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by James Wittenborg

 

Related Content: EuroBAIBA Hospitality ManagementTickerText: EuroBA steering group meets at Ecole de Savignac, France

A pre-Master & MSc in Hospitality, Tourism or Event Management Package

Fri, 10/24/2014 - 17:08
Language English

Prospective Master of Science students wishing to prepare themselves for their chosen MSc programme can now combine it with a half-year Pre-Master course for an additional fee of only €1.700! Wittenborg University this month launched its unique Master of Science “Combi Package” online which have already attracted substantial interest from international students.

The special combi package for 2015 is a result of an initiative of Wittenborg and its research partners to stimulate students wishing to follow a research degree pathway in the area of International Hospitality Management, International Tourism or Event Management.

Application for the combination programme is now open and will be offered as of February 2015.

The combination package is for students wishing to study the Master of Science in International Hospitality Management, the Master of Science in International Event Management or the Master of Science in International Tourism Management and require (or would like to) study a ½ year preparation course. Students only have to choose their Master of Science pathway by the end of the first semester, thus allowing complete flexibility.

Previously, there was a separate fee structure for students wishing to do both the Pre-master and a Master of Science degree.  Wittenborg University’s registrar, Santosh Aryal, said not only is the combination package cheaper for international students but also very useful.

According to Aryal, the new combination package features a few more management modules than the Pre-Master had before. “When the student does not have enough academic experience in management we try to fill the gap with this combi-package to prepare him or her more adequately for the Master of Science programme.”

Wittenborg’s marketing sales assistant, Florian Oosterberg (right), added this would be particularly useful for students who might have the academic qualifications to gain admission to the MSc programme, but who have limited knowledge or experience in the field of management or business. “It holds benefits not only from an academic point of view, but also give students the time to get use to life in the Netherlands.”

From a time perspective the length of the combination package is 18 months for full-time MSc-students and 30 months for part-time students.

Aryal said the reason for adding more management modules to the pre-master side of the combi-package is to prepare students event better. “We thought the previous programme was not challenging enough. Completing a master-degree programme can be a heavy load, hence the added modules help to prepare students even better.”

As usual he expects students will apply from all over the world. “February is a good time to start as the weather will soon after begin to warm up.”

WUP 24/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: International Event Management MSc ProgrammeMaster Hospitality ManagementMaster International TourismMBATickerText: A pre-Master & MSc in Hospitality, Tourism or Event Management Package

To like or not to like

Wed, 10/22/2014 - 05:06
Language English

Wittenborg’s social media advertising on Facebook – “likes” getting out of proportion?  - In a world obsessed with social-media there can be no doubt about the value of social networks like Facebook and Twitter to boost a business’ public profile. Thus, the temptation to buy likes or clicks for your page to create an impression of popularity looms large for many. The only problem is, if there is no engagement from your audience – no matter how large – what value does it really add to your business?

This is the question Wittenborg University, like many other businesses around the world, has been trying to digest and find a suitable equilibrium.

It became especially pronounced when it recently came to our attention that the number of “likes” on Wittenborg’s Facebook page have raised questions from users. Facebook adverts cause a “like” to be registered every time the ad is clicked, distorting the traditional way in which “likes” are perceived by individual users.

Over the years Wittenborg has professionalized its advertising usage through Google ads. In addition, Wittenborg’s marketing department has experimented with several other advertising mediums like Facebook and LinkedIn in order to boost its student intake and brand value.

These advertising strategies have led to many new prospective students showing interest in Wittenborg and the service it offers. Its new marketing strategies have also opened new borders to reach an increasingly wider audience. However, there is a blind side to the exciting new possibilities that social media holds – namely that it is hard to determine to what extend we are reaching the intended audience versus the number of “blank shots” fired.

This inevitably leads to the question of to what extent the benefit outweighs the disadvantages and the institute has recognized the need for a more focused, targeted approach in the use of social media like Facebook.

According to Wittenborg’s marketing and communication officer, Nicky van Riggelen, the university definitely gets enquiries about its programmes via Facebook than before, and an increased LinkedIn brand awareness with businesses. “For October we have already received at least 10 information requests through Facebook. This may not seem like a huge number, but Wittenborg is a small university. We use LinkedIn mostly for brand awareness with other businesses.” Currently Wittenborg receives around 400 information requests a month, with around 220 thousand unique visitors to its website each year, many through google ads and facebook.

Wittenborg’s front desk and facility officer, Eva van Herel, said whenever the university invests in Google ads there is a “real, positive response from people interested in seeking information about studying at Wittenborg”.

WUP 21/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

 

Related Content: Social MediaFacebookMBATickerText: To like or not to like

Wittenborg’s Anesca Smith speaks to new lecturer Alexander Bauer

Sat, 10/18/2014 - 04:54
Language English

He has quit his job as a very successful sales and marketing manager traveling the world and now Alexander Bauer, who has a PhD degree in International Business Management, has brought his expertise to Wittenborg University as one of the latest additions to its teaching staff. Here he talks about the rewards of teaching and his love for sailing and the theatre.

Welcome to Wittenborg Alexander. Where are you from?

I am originally German, but been living for the past eight years in Vienna, Austria, where I was working as a sales and marketing manager.

What will you be teaching?

Marketing and Strategy modules for the undergraduate classes and for the Master degree students Management Strategy in a Global Business Environment.

What is the key to being a good sales person?

The stereotype of sales people is that they like to talk and talk and talk. My experience is that you really have to listen to the people you are trying to sell to.

What made you decide to go into academia?

I had a very demanding job in sales and managing, requiring a lot of travel and for more than a decade it was really great seeing different countries.  After some time I decided I wanted to do something new. I thought it would be nice to pass on the knowledge I have gained and I always enjoyed training youngsters and new sales staff in a company environment.

Why did you choose Holland?

Coincidence. A few years ago I met Maggie (Feng, Wittenborg director), we stayed in contact and at the beginning of the year I quit my job. For the first few months I went sailing. In May I was in Amsterdam and came in to see Maggie and Peter (Birdsall, Wittenborg director) and we agreed I would come in September to start teaching.  We will see how it goes from there.

What was it like quitting your job? Weren’t you anxious?

It took me a year to reach the decision! You feel what you are doing is not the right thing for you anymore, but still it’s difficult to let go. Most of my colleagues have become friends. It’s like a sticky old relationship - leaving the comfort zone was the hardest part.

Looking back, are you happy with your decision?

I am very happy about it. Teaching is great. It’s much more rewarding than just going out and being a sales manager. Of course, you earn great money but mostly you sell for your company. Here, with the students, you feel like you’re doing something that makes much more sense because you pass on knowledge.

You started with your PhD in 2007?

Yes, a friend and I decided to do it together, alongside our job. He didn’t finish his and it took me until 2011 – two days before Christmas I finished my defense. It was on innovative and intercultural marketing tools from the business ethics perspective.

What sort of undergraduate student were you?

As a student I liked parties and I didn’t go to classes scheduled before 10am – in Germany you don’t have to be there just to pass your exam - but I always enjoyed going to the smaller classes. Marketing and sales were very interesting to me. At Wittenborg it is much better to be in class because they are small. You have the chance to really speak to the teacher and have a discussion. At the really big universities, or even the medium ones, if you sit in a class of 100 students or more you don’t see the teacher and he doesn’t see you. You have limited time to interact.

How would you describe your first month at Wittenborg? What was the best thing about it and what could be improved?

The best thing is that everyone welcomed me with open arms from Day One. From the staff to the students. Sometimes when you start at a new company you start with a negative – you have to prove yourself to them first.

Like going to prison?

Haha. Yes, like you’re the new one in prison. Here you start with a positive. Everyone is very welcoming and helpful. I learned so many new things and met so many interesting people.

What could be improved?

When you start new there’s a lot of information and thick guides – and they’re very helpful of course – but it could be overwhelming in the beginning. It would be nice that have just a little bit more guidance on how to use everything. 

What do you do in your free time besides sailing?

Sailing, scuba diving and rock-climbing. I am also part of a small theatre group in Vienna. We have been playing together for the past 6 years and almost every year manage to have something on stage.

Why do you like acting? What do you get from it?

It’s a fun group – very diverse characters. Once you get a role you reflect on that, you start thinking how to play and develop it. You come out from your own perspective and play someone completely different.  It also helps in the business world when you have to negotiate with someone and you learn to put yourself in their shoes.

WUP 17/10/2014

WUP 17/10/2014  -Wittenborg’s Anesca Smith speaks to new lecturer Alexander Bauer - He has quit his job as a very successful sales and marketing manager traveling the world and now Alexander Bauer, who has a PhD degree in International Business Management, has brought his expertise to Wittenborg University as one of the latest additions to its teaching staff. Here he talks about the rewards of teaching and his love for sailing and the theatre.

Welcome to Wittenborg Alexander. Where are you from?

I am originally German, but been living for the past eight years in Vienna, Austria, where I was working as a sales and marketing manager.

What will you be teaching?

Marketing and Strategy modules for the undergraduate classes and for the Master degree students Management Strategy in a Global Business Environment.

What is the key to being a good sales person?

The stereotype of sales people is that they like to talk and talk and talk. My experience is that you really have to listen to the people you are trying to sell to.

What made you decide to go into academia?

I had a very demanding job in sales and managing, requiring a lot of travel and for more than a decade it was really great seeing different countries.  After some time I decided I wanted to do something new. I thought it would be nice to pass on the knowledge I have gained and I always enjoyed training youngsters and new sales staff in a company environment.

Why did you choose Holland?

Coincidence. A few years ago I met Maggie (Feng, Wittenborg director), we stayed in contact and at the beginning of the year I quit my job. For the first few months I went sailing. In May I was in Amsterdam and came in to see Maggie and Peter (Birdsall, Wittenborg director) and we agreed I would come in September to start teaching.  We will see how it goes from there.

What was it like quitting your job? Weren’t you anxious?

It took me a year to reach the decision! You feel what you are doing is not the right thing for you anymore, but still it’s difficult to let go. Most of my colleagues have become friends. It’s like a sticky old relationship - leaving the comfort zone was the hardest part.

Looking back, are you happy with your decision?

I am very happy about it. Teaching is great. It’s much more rewarding than just going out and being a sales manager. Of course, you earn great money but mostly you sell for your company. Here, with the students, you feel like you’re doing something that makes much more sense because you pass on knowledge.

You started with your PhD in 2007?

Yes, a friend and I decided to do it together, alongside our job. He didn’t finish his and it took me until 2011 – two days before Christmas I finished my defense. It was on innovative and intercultural marketing tools from the business ethics perspective.

What sort of undergraduate student were you?

As a student I liked parties and I didn’t go to classes scheduled before 10am – in Germany you don’t have to be there just to pass your exam - but I always enjoyed going to the smaller classes. Marketing and sales were very interesting to me. At Wittenborg it is much better to be in class because they are small. You have the chance to really speak to the teacher and have a discussion. At the really big universities, or even the medium ones, if you sit in a class of 100 students or more you don’t see the teacher and he doesn’t see you. You have limited time to interact.

How would you describe your first month at Wittenborg? What was the best thing about it and what could be improved?

The best thing is that everyone welcomed me with open arms from Day One. From the staff to the students. Sometimes when you start at a new company you start with a negative – you have to prove yourself to them first.

Like going to prison?

Haha. Yes, like you’re the new one in prison. Here you start with a positive. Everyone is very welcoming and helpful. I learned so many new things and met so many interesting people.

What could be improved?

When you start new there’s a lot of information and thick guides – and they’re very helpful of course – but it could be overwhelming in the beginning. It would be nice that have just a little bit more guidance on how to use everything. 

What do you do in your free time besides sailing?

Sailing, scuba diving and rock-climbing. I am also part of a small theatre group in Vienna. We have been playing together for the past 6 years and almost every year manage to have something on stage.

Why do you like acting? What do you get from it?

It’s a fun group – very diverse characters. Once you get a role you reflect on that, you start thinking how to play and develop it. You come out from your own perspective and play someone completely different.  It also helps in the business world when you have to negotiate with someone and you learn to put yourself in their shoes.

WUP 17/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

Interview by Anesca Smith

 

 

Related Content: International ClassoomMBAMscTickerText: Wittenborg’s Anesca Smith speaks to new lecturer Alexander Bauer

Wittenborg at Smart Grids Event to promote GREAT!

Wed, 10/15/2014 - 13:30

To promote sustainable energy and its involvement in the European GREAT-project, Wittenborg University last week joined stakeholders at an information and networking event about “Smart Grids”. Wittenborg was represented by Director Maggie Feng and Wittenborg lecturer and researcher Dr Saskia Harkema.

The event, held last Thursday, is part of the “Green Tech Week”, organized by the Smart Grid Alliance and was aimed at SME’s (MKB’s) with international ambitions interested in the Smart Grids and the Smart Energy Markets. It is part of a series of events and initiatives Wittenborg and its partners will be involved in in the coming weeks to promote Smart Grids and the GREAT project. During the event, a series of innovation vouchers were launched to help stimulate internationalization and cross-national innovation, as part of the overall GREAT project.

GREAT is a cross-border EU-funded project which aims to encourage communities as well as small to medium size enterprises (SME’s) to develop technological solutions for Smart Grid, Renewable Energy and Distributive Generation. It also promotes research and develop policy issues for regulatory authorities and provide structured co-operation opportunities between SMEs, research institutes and technology developers.

In this project, Wittenborg University is developing economic tools to inform and encourage SME to get further engaged in the use of green energy. The first economic tool, dealing with solar energy, was presented at a successful Tech Watch event in Claremorris, Ireland, recently organized by the Irish partners in GREAT, Údarás na Gaeltachta and WestBIC. Different regions and organizations in Ireland, the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands are driving the project.

SmartGrid Alliance (SGA) is a network of Cleantech companies and organizations actively involved in Smart Grids and Smart Energy. SGA is aimed at stimulating, initiating and supporting of Smart Grids, energy projects and energy proposals. It is a subsidiary of GreenTech Alliance and supported by the Ontwikkelingsmaatschappij Oost Nederland (Oost NV) and Gelderland, the province where Wittenborg is located.

At Thursday’s event guests will be introduced to new technologies, market developments and the supporting tools to explore the international and European Union market.

Wittenborg director, Maggie Feng who is leading the research centre team for the GREAT-project, said earlier: “Wittenborg believes that its research projects should have a direct impact on the regional economy that our University belongs to, for instance, the Municipality of Apeldoorn, the Province of Gelderland, and even the Netherlands as a whole. The GREAT project provides Wittenborg the opportunity to contribute to development of sustainable policy and implementation of renewable energy application in the region, specifically working with small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs), coupled with the stimulation of investment in human capitol, essential for the regional and national economy.

WUP 15/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by James Wittenborg

Related Content:  greatproject Wittenborg Research Centre

 

Language English TickerText: Wittenborg at Smart Grids Event to promote GREAT!

The Netherlands needs international students!

Wed, 10/15/2014 - 11:20
Language English

This was the message of the Dutch minister of Higher Education, Jet Bussemaker, while touring various Universities around the country this month. Bussemaker made her remarks as she kicked off the tour at Stenden University in the north of Holland. “We need international students. Not only to improve the quality of higher education in the Netherlands, but also to give Dutch students exposure to international perspectives.”

In the coming six months the minister will visit another four regions in the country where students, lecturers and university managers will have the opportunity to talk to the minister about the future of higher education in the Netherlands.

This weekend the Association of Universities of Applied Science disclosed that the number of international students who started with their higher education this September at the beginning of the new academic year have diminished by 4 400 compared to the same period last year. There is not yet any explanation as to the possible causes for the decrease. This trend was not seen at Wittenborg, where its international student numbers have grown again by around 20% in 2014.

The organization represents part of a conglomerate of university bodies who wrote to Bussemaker earlier this year stressing that in order to attract top international students to the Netherlands, the country urgently needs a bursary (scholarship) programme. 

The Dutch government, in response, announced that it will make €5 million available annually for bursaries which will be allocated to international as well as Dutch students. The scholarship program will be created whereby 1000 scholarships worth €5,000 each will be awarded - primarily for students from outside the EER, but also for Dutch students wishing to study abroad. 

The decision, which Bussemaker announced in a letter encompassing her vision for adding an international dimension to Dutch higher education, is expected to see thousands of international students coming to the Netherlands in the next few years.

“In my view internationalization is crucial for the acquirement of a knowledge-economy, skills and professional competencies,” Bussemaker writes in the letter. She highlighted the unique selling points of the Netherlands, including its binary system offering professional (applied science) and academic (research) degrees, quality education and is popular among students from countries from all over the world due to its huge supply of English-taught courses.

Wittenborg University is proud of its truly international character boasting more than 60 different nationalities among its students and staff. Last week the university welcomed its latest cohort of around international students who will follow either an International Master of Science degree in Hospitality Management or a Master of Science degree in Event Management. This week a new cohort of around 25 Bachelor students started their programmes. Wittenborg has 6 entries a year for its Bachelor programmes, which is very attractive to international students. The next starts are in December 2014 and February 2015.

WUP 15/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Link: http://www.wittenborg.eu/dutch-minister-education-jet-bussemaker-pays-vi...

Related Content: international studentsMinister BussemakerInternational ClassoomTickerText: The Netherlands needs international students!

African Business Event - 6 November 2014

Sat, 10/11/2014 - 14:07
Language English AFRICAN BUSINESS EVENT
6 NOVEMBER 2014
16:00 - 19:00
(Welcome and Drinks from 15:30)

 

Friends and associates of Wittenborg University!  Please mark your calendar for Thursday, 6 November 2014. Wittenborg will host an African Business-to-Business Event celebrating Africa and highlighting the many business, cooperation and investment opportunities the continent has to offer. According to a recent article in the Economist*, Africa was the world’s fastest growing continental economy in 2013, achieving yearly growth of over 5%, and GDP is expected to rise by an average of over 6% annually between 2013 and 2023. The African labour force is becoming increasingly educated, with nearly half the working population expected to have some secondary-level education by 2020.

 

Africa at Wittenborg

Wittenborg University currently hosts 45 students from 14 different African countries. Together with them and Wittenborg’s friends we are looking forward to creating and increased awareness for the potential and possibilities that the African market has to offer companies and businesses in the region, in the Netherlands and around the world.

 

Please join us for this event, for instance if you are interested in expanding your business abroad, enlarging your network, either as members of the African community in the Netherlands or you are interested in linking up with stakeholders in Africa such companies and businesses there or government representatives or NGO’s. Please join us even if you are just interested in the continent of Africa and Wittenborg’s African students!

 

The programme will feature inspiring speakers, highlighting business trends and lucrative investment sectors in Africa and offer the opportunity for attendants to engage in a panel discussion with experts in the (African) field.

PROGRAMME:
15.30-16.00 Welcome with coffee and tea
16.00-17.30 Official Programme
17.30-19.00 Information market and finger food/drinks

WHAT: African Business Event
 
WHEN: 6 November 2014 | 16.00 - 19.00
 
WHERE: Wittenborg University, 500 Laan van de Mensenrechten, 7331VZ, Apeldoorn 

* Source: http://www.economist.com/news/special-report/21572377-african-lives-have...

Related Content: AfricaInternational ClassoomMBATickerText: African Business Event - 6 November 2014

Wittenborg attends the opening of a project at the new Apeldoorn Business Campus, that has a real life Wittenborg Project Week behind it!

Thu, 10/09/2014 - 21:24

The new Apeldoorn Business Campus, part of a project dreamt up by a Wittenborg student in 2012 is situated in the building formally base to Achmea Insurance. Two years ago, Wittenborg students were involved in a project to suggest new alternative uses for this large and renowned piece of late 20th century Dutch architecture!

One of the solutions that has been implemented is the idea to create a “Business Campus” that suggests the combining of entrepreneurship and innovation with education in a “campus:” setting.  Today’s event surrounded the launching of Apeldoorn’s version of “VentureLab”, a project that runs throughout the Netherlands under the flag of the University of Twente, a top research University based in Enschede on the eastern Dutch border.

Venturelab will support budding young entrepreneurs in the Business Campus with workshops in the area of strategies for innovation and entrepreneurship, although not in operation business administration, which could be an opportunity for Wittenborg to lend a hand, according to Wittenborg’s lecturer, and business developer, Alexander Bauer PhD, who attended the event.

For the original article about the project that became the Apeldoorn Business Campus see: A real-life business project for Wittenborg students (14/02/2012). - the article is about a project started by Wittenborg students in 2011 to look at a re-generation of the building by its owners TCN: 

The winning group of the TCN Real Estate Project was the group calling themselves ‘Novarum’. Marketing and Communication student Débora Heiderich was the project leader. “It was an amazing project - real-life, which made it very interesting. We came up with a business incubator that could stimulate people to come up with new ideas themselves in a creative environment. I believe it’s a good concept for Apeldoorn, where many people start their own business. It is a great experience to work with external parties and I’ve learned a lot. Real-life projects are more than welcome.”

WUP 9/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by the Wittenborg Team

Related Content: 

Real-life project Wittenborg University Apeldoorn Students TCN Centraal Beheer Achmea

 

 

Language English TickerText: Wittenborg attends the opening of a project at the new Apeldoorn Business Campus

Master of Science programmes in International Hospitality & International Event Management get off to a good start again!

Wed, 10/08/2014 - 22:02
Language English

Wittenborg University this week welcomed its latest cohort of Master of Science students taking part in a two-day introduction course before starting officially with their degree programme on Thursday. Wittenborg’s MSc-degree programmes in Hospitality, Tourism and Event Management are offered in partnership with the University of Brighton in the UK.

This year there are seven new students who will follow the Master of Science in Event Management programme and six who will do a Master of Science in Hospitality Management. The students come from around the world - from respectively Indonesia, China, Vietnam, Russia, the Netherlands, Hungary, Nepal, Pakistan and Iran. Dutch student, Wilco Camp, will follow the programme on a part-time basis, combining his work at Stenden University with his Master studies.

On Tuesday, the students were welcomed by Wittenborg director, Peter Birdsall, and Wittenborg lecturers Karin Pelle and Esther Gitonga. Birdsall said "offering a joint-delivery academic programme with a University in the UK - transnational eduation - in effect 'imported' to the Netherlands and also have that university joint-manage the programme is very rare."

“In fact, the (Dutch) government is very interested in what we are doing here as they wish to encourage Dutch universities to take their own programmes abroad.” He also said Wittenborg is looking forward to getting feedback from students about the programme.

Later a general introduction of the MSc programmes was provided by Chris Dutton, Brighton University’s Deputy Head of School of Sport & Service Management:

Dutton explained that the University of Brighton rarely forms partnerships with other universities abroad, but they were impressed by the work done at Wittenborg. He also warned that the full-time MSc programme is “very challenging” but hugely rewarding. “You will feel proud the day you graduate,” Dutton said.

Today Chris Dutton will gave an introduction to the MSc students on the learning resources available and their use.

WUP 8/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: Master Hospitality ManagementMaster International TourismInternational Event Management MSc ProgrammeUniversity of BrightonTickerText: Master of Science programmes in Hospitality International Event Management get off to a good start again!

Shanghai Business School Students Sad To Leave Holland!

Tue, 10/07/2014 - 21:59
Language English

The 10 students from the Shanghai Business School who were hosted by Wittenborg University this week said goodbye to the Netherlands today after a packed week of cultural exchange, fun and learning.The group, who were accompanied by a lecturer from the Shanghai Business School, arrived last Thursday – bleary-eyed from the long flight between Shanghai and Amsterdam’s Schiphol airport. They were welcomed at Wittenborg by directors Maggie Feng and Peter Birdsall, members of staff and some of the students.

The week’s programme started off with a tour of the Wittenborg-premises in Apeldoorn and an introduction to life as a student here. It also included guest-lecturers by Wittenborg senior lecturers Karin Pelle and Alexander Bauer, a taste of Dutch cuisine and a visit to some of the top-attractions in the Apeldoorn region.

On Friday the group visited the summer residence of the Dutch royal family, Het Loo Palace, accompanied by two Wittenborg students Matthew Carter and Raymon Driessen.

Carter said: “During the visit we had a guided tour around the palace which was very informative. Afterwards we had a walk around the Palace gardens and a drink in the Palace bar which was situated in the former guest house. In the evening we had a dinner at the Hotel where the students were staying.  After the meal we asked if they would like to see our student housing as we had seen there’s on our trip to Shanghai earlier this year. They were very interested to see the differences between student housing here in Holland and China.”

On Saturday the Chinese students visited Amsterdam. When asked what was the most fun thing about the week, one student Xu Lu (Lucy) said: “Shopping for clothes!”

Monday evening the students had dinner at the Hotel de Paris restaurant in Apeldoorn. They were joined by a few members of the Wittenborg staff. The university’s front desk and facility officer, Eva van Herel, said one interesting observation she made was that the Chinese students love to share. “We also had some great conversations around the table,  including on the phenomenon of ‘Chinglish’ – a mixture of English and the Chinese language which immediately elevates you to a certain level of cool if you’re in Shanghai and know a few phrases.”

This morning the group was sent off with cake and a few encouraging words from Birdsall. One student said after this visit she definitely prefers the Netherlands above Shanghai. “It is more quiet, clean and people are definitely more friendly.”

WUP 7/10/2014

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: Shanghai Business SchoolInternational ClassoomTickerText: Shanghai Business School Students Sad To Leave!

Wittenborg presntation at the opening of the CleanTech Centre in Zutphen!

Sat, 10/04/2014 - 23:17
Language English

Wittenborg University today presented the GREAT-project, an ambitious European research project the university is one of only two Dutch partners in, at the official opening of the CleanTech Centre in Zuthpen on Saturday between 13:00 and 16:00. The other Dutch partner is Ontwikkelingsmaatchappij Oost-Nederland (Oost NV). The CleanTech Centre is a sustainable innovation centre catering for the eastern region of the Netherlands where knowledge about a sustainable future is exchanged between the private sector, educational institutes and the public sector. It further seeks to address the challenges companies face in terms of clean technology and smart energy by clustering these needs and finding solutions by partnering with government agencies and the education sector.

GREAT is a cross-border EU-funded project which aims to encourage small to medium size enterprises (SME’s) as well as communities to develop technological solutions for Smart Grid, Renewable Energy and Distributive Generation. It also promotes research and develop policy issues for regulatory authorities and provide structured co-operation opportunities between SMEs, research institutes and technology developers.

On Saturday Wittenborg, presented by university director Maggie Feng and senior lecturers Mirjam Leloux and Alexander Bauer, through its own information stall at the CleanTech Centre’s “Future Market”.

As partner in the GREAT-project, Wittenborg has developed the first of a set of economic tools to inform and encourage SME’s to get further engaged in the use of green energy. The first economic tool, dealing with solar energy, was presented at a successful Tech Watch event in Claremorris, Ireland, recently organized by the Irish partners in GREAT, Údarás na Gaeltachta and WestBIC.

These economic tools helps SME’s to recognize the existing business opportunities in the sustainable energy market in the Netherlands, England, Ireland and Belgium.

At today's event Wittenborg will also offered innovation vouchers available to businesses which give access to free advice and support to businesses in order to stimulate transnational trade, Feng said. It also views the event as an ideal opportunity to promote the book “Sustainable Value Creation” which was penned by Wittenborg senior lecturer dr Teun Wolters and published by Wittenborg University Press last year.

At the same time it promoted an information and networking event on Smart Grids which is taking place on Thursday, the 9th of October as part of Green Tech Week, organized by the Smart Grid Alliance, which is part of the GREAT-project. Thursday’s event will take place at Watts Connects (Energy Businesspark Arnhem Buiten, Utrechtseweg 310, Gebouw HO2, Arnhem).

WUP 4/10/2014

Related Content: greatprojectSustainable Value CreationTickerText: Wittenborg presntation at the opening of the CleanTech Centre in Zutphen!

Wittenborg Representatives Ready for the Education Fair in Martiniplaza, Groningen

Sat, 10/04/2014 - 09:19

Last week Wittenborg was one of the  exhibitors at the Education Fair in Eindhoven. Around one-hundred Educational Institutes were represented at the Fair, ranging from vocational education to universities, both privately funded and subsidized. The three representatives of Wittenborg were pleasantly surprised by the size and scope of the Fair. Around 21.000 Dutch students (and parents) have visited the fair.

“ The Eindhoven Fair was a great success. Many students and parents from the South of the Netherlands have visited our stand. Most of the interested students were attracted by the broad bachelor in International Business Administration. The first year of this Bachelor course is the same for all students, after the first year they decide on a specialization. This allows students who find it difficult to choose to extend their choice with one more year. Besides that the Bachelor programme allows students to finish in 3 years instead of 4 years. All in all the Fair was a good experience and the Marketing team is ready for the coming two fairs in Groningen and Zwolle”.

After a great two-day education fair in Eindhoven the Wittenborg Representatives are already packing for their next fair. This Friday and Saturday Wittenborg will be attending the Education Fair in Groningen Martiniplaza.

WUP 3/10/2014
 

Language English

Pages

Search Wittenborg


Contact

 

Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences

Click here to Email Us!

Laan van de Mensenrechten 500
7331 VZ, Apeldoorn
The Netherlands

Tel : +31 (0)88 6672 688
Fax : +31 (0)88 6672699
info@wittenborg.nl

Social Network