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Updated: 3 hours 58 min ago

Wittenborg alumnus now sales engineer in Vietnam

Sat, 01/31/2015 - 10:01
Language English

As part of an interview-series with alumni from Wittenborg University, we caught up with Ben Visser, a Dutchman who is a sales engineer in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Ben regularly hangs out with old classmates from Wittenborg who also live and work in the city.

Chào ông Ben. Where in the Netherlands do you come from?

The Rotterdam area!

Which year did you graduate from Wittenborg University and which degree did you earn?

I graduated in 2012 and graduated with an IBA in Economics and Management.

Why did you choose to study at Wittenborg?

Before my studies at Wittenborg I followed a UK BTEC program (Dutch MBO level) at the Albeda College in Rotterdam. This BTEC diploma granted a first year exemption for the IBA program at Wittenborg. Besides that, I was drawn by the international character of the school. To me Wittenborg was the best choice.

How did your study and career path develop since graduating from Wittenborg?

Since my graduation I moved to Vietnam where I work for a Dutch company called Eriks/Econosto. Here I am responsible for internal sales handling. This involves a lot of co-ordination and communication worldwide.

What has been the extent of your involvement with Wittenborg since you graduated?

I recently joined an alumni event of Vietnamese students who graduated in The Netherlands.  I met some former students and one of my former teachers from Wittenborg  gave a seminar. Other than that there has been little contact with other students and teachers or the school.

Do you think it is important to be involved, or at the very least, keep some contact with one’s alma mater after graduation?

I think that to a certain extent it is good to remain in touch, albeit occasionally. People should never forget where they came from and how they got where they are now.

Would you be interested in joining a formal alumni association from Wittenborg?

Yes, definitely.

What would you expect from such an organization?

A newsletter is a good start - including interviews with former students and such. Personally it would be great to know how former classmates and teachers are doing.

Are you still in touch with any of your fellow students or staff from Wittenborg?

I am in touch with some former classmates in Vietnam.  I also regularly meet with a former lecturer Prof Loek Hopstaken who  also lives in Ho Chi Minh City.

What are some of your fondest memories from studying at Wittenborg?

I have good memories of the conversations with students and teachers at Wittenborg – especially with regards to the multicultural aspect.  Every student was, and probably still is, encouraged to speak their mind resulting in beautiful discussions in class, offering many different ways of looking at things.

Would you be interested in being to some sort of service to current students?

Not really at the moment other than sharing experiences.

What did studying at an internationally-orientated university mean to you? Do you think it added value to the quality of education you received?

Not necessarily the quality of education, but the “additional” education you received from being with students and teachers from different countries, cultures and backgrounds.  It did make me realize how different (my) viewpoints can be sometimes.

Would you recommend the Netherlands (and Wittenborg) as a study destination?

I would absolutely recommend Wittenborg. I look back at my study with great satisfaction – the teachers and the rest of the staff had a great deal to do with that.

Did you work while you were studying?

During my study I worked 2 days a week at the company I am currently employed by.

What were some of the challenges you faced as a student?

My biggest challenge was how to combine work and study in such a way that one did not suffer from the other.

Would you recommend doing an internship as part of the study experience? If so, why?

Doing an internship is a very important part of the study experience. It helps you get a taste of real life outside the school walls and it might give you the right contacts to get a job after you graduated. I started working for Econosto (part of Eriks) after I completed an internship there and 7 years later I am still working for this company.

What advice would you give new graduates wishing to enter the job market based on your own experience?

I think the most important part of finding a job is having the right people in your network who can help you. They can put you in the right direction or have direct contact with the employers you are looking for. So basically build on your network whenever you can and as quick as possible.

What short and long term ambitions do you have for yourself career wise?

At the end of this year I hope to return to The Netherlands where I will continue my career at Econosto. My medium to long term focus is to be in a mid-level manager within the company. Before that I hope to perform several functions within the organization to gain more and diverse experiences. It is important for me to strike a good balance between work and family.

That sounds like a very sensible, Dutch thing to do! Thank you Ben.

WUP 31/1/2015

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

 

Related Content: International ClassoomWork PlacementWittenborg University AlumniTickerText: Wittenborg alumnus now sales engineer in Vietnam

Wittenborg students & staff to run Apeldoorn 'marathon'

Sat, 01/31/2015 - 09:51
Language English

Several students and staff members of Wittenborg University will take part in the Apeldoorn  Midwinter 'Marathon' on Sunday and they need your support!

More than 13 700 people are expected to take part in the race which features several courses. If you don’t want to miss Wittenborg’s winter warriors – who will take part in the 8km course - look out for participants wearing t-shirts bearing the university’s logo. Remember, participants from abroad can collect their race number on the day itself at Orpheus Theatre & Conference Centre

Although 8km may not sound like a lot to the rest of us coach potatoes, doing any kind of running in winter is not easy – weather reports predict icy conditions for Sunday – which is they need all the support they can get.

The details of the programme are as follows:

14:00 - Wittenborg runners and fans amass at the Big Church on the corner of Loolaan and Kerklaan, Apeldoorn. Participants can pick up their T-shirts at this point.

14:15 – Group photo

15:00 – Start of Marathon in Loolaan

Supporters can cheer runners on at the following points:

·         At the AGOVV traffic circle (at the end of Kennedy Laan)

·         At the corner of Wildernislaan and 2de Beukenlaan

·         De Naald

What motivated these runners to take part in the marathon?  Wittenborg lecturer, Alexander Bauer, says he thinks it’s fun to run in a group.  “In Vienna I did a couple of city runs where people from different companies take part. You make a lot of business contacts that way and meet people in the industry. You have to train because you want to have a decent time. It’s not so much about the timing, but more about the social aspect. I had a very irregular schedule, but I tried to run at least once a week this winter – depending on the weather and in the last two weeks it becomes more intensive.”

*The results of the race will be announced online.

WUP 31/1/2015

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: ApeldoornStudy in Hollandstudy in the netherlandsTickerText: Wittenborg students, staff to run Apeldoorn marathon

Cleantech Tomorrow Event: Wittenborg to Present Opportunities in International Energy Sector

Thu, 01/29/2015 - 21:59
Language English

Experts from Wittenborg University will present a workshop at the second annual Cleantech Tomorrow Event on 2 and 3 February in Apeldoorn. The event focuses on the use and production of clean technology by companies, the public sector and individuals. This year the emphasis will be on natural resources and food production.

The workshop is entitled: Sustainability and Innovation: A window for international market opportunities, by Wittenborg University and Oost NV. The event will be at the Theater Orpheus in Apeldoorn. Details about the full programme can be found here.

Wittenborg and Oost NV are partners in the cross-border, EU-funded GREAT-project which aims to encourage communities as well as small to medium size enterprises (SME’s) to develop technological solutions for Smart Grid, Renewable Energy and Distributive Generation. It also promotes research and develop policy issues for regulatory authorities and provide structured co-operation opportunities between SMEs, research institutes and technology developers.

In this project, Wittenborg is developing economic tools to inform and encourage SME’s to get further engaged in the use of green energy, stimulating investment in human capital, essential for the regional and national economy. Besides the Netherlands, the other partners in the GREAT-project are from Ireland, the UK and Belgium.

The workshop seeks to inspire innovative business opportunities in the clean energy field but also serve as a matchmaking session between companies and those who have experience in the international energy market or looking for access to the market.

The workshop will be opened by Jan Jonker from Oost NV who will introduce the GREAT project as a way of stimulating internationalization and renewable, sustainable energy area in North West Europe. He will also make an introduction about Smart Grid Alliances, Oost NV and its role in the GREAT project.

This will be followed by a talk from Wittenborg director, Maggie Feng, and senior lecturer, Saskia Harkema, who will introduce the university and the value of the tools it has developed for SME’s. Thereafter there will be an open discussion on the presentations.

On the progress made around the GREAT-project Harkema said In the Netherlands and Belgium a pilot is being run, to explore among a selected group of SME’s, what they are doing in this field.

“A selection has been made to focus on three sectors, namely: Manufacturing Industry, Agro-Food and Logistics. A small pilot will be run in which 20 companies will be approached to make a first assessment about their present application and usage of energy efficient technologies and solutions and obstacles to do so. To that end a digital questionnaire was developed," Harkema said.

“In The Netherlands we have spoken to several stakeholders from governmental organizations that play a coordinating role in trying to engage SME’s to use more energy efficient solutions and raise awareness to that effect. They showed a great interest in the GREAT project and re-affirmed the importance of the project. According to the people we spoke, SME’s are lagging behind when it comes to the adoption of energy efficiency in their business model or in their way of doing business. For SME’s, the use of renewable energy is primarily driven by (possible) financial gains – how much does it cost, and what is the financial benefit? - and only in second instance by the importance to think in terms of sustainability. “Within the region where Wittenborg University is located, in the east of The Netherlands, the municipality works with 8 so-called decentralized regional operational units which have a controlling and supervisory task and a role to engage with individual SME’S and groups of SME’s.  The emphasis till now has been on control and supervision, but the aim is now to gear the efforts towards SME’s. The small-scale research we are carrying out should give us more insight in what are the barriers and obstacles which are holding back SME’s to go for energy efficient solutions. “

CleanTech stands for clean techniques that contribute to a sustainable world. This relates to products or services that contribute to a cleaner environment, the reuse of raw materials and/or energy savings and improving operational performances by increasing productivity and efficiency while reducing costs, energy consumption and waste.

WUP 29/1/2015

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: greatprojectWittenborg Research CentreWittenborg University PressTickerText: Cleantech Tomorrow Event: Wittenborg to Present Opportunities in International Energy Sector

Wittenborg to expand its campus this summer in line with rapid growth – Staff Visit the New Building at the Spoorstraat!

Wed, 01/28/2015 - 21:59
Language English

((Watch the video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImHoNQ0kMaY)

Wittenborg University is growing! Due to a steady rise in student numbers and rapid program developments, Wittenborg University will expand to a new building this summer, mere minutes away from its current location near the Apeldoorn railway station.

The Spoorstraat 23 building was originally constructed in the 1920's as a junior boys’ school and, although not large at just over 800 square meters, it has an excellent, visible location overlooking the central bus station and clearly visible from the railway lines running into the central railway station.

Guests, students and staff were able to get a preview of the new facilities, which are to house the university’s new research campus, when they treated to a special tour by Wittenborg management recently. “We are working on having it ready by early summer,” Wittenborg director, Maggie Feng said.

Staff were immensely impressed with the new facilities, which features high ceilings and airy, light-filled rooms, when they visited. The program coordinator for Wittenborg’s School of Hospitality, Esther Gitonga, enthused: “I can’t wait to start working from here. There is plenty of space and the building will be entirely our own.”

Since its move from Deventer in 2010, Wittenborg, with its distinct international character, has been located in the right wing of the ROC Aventus building. However, even before 2010 the development of a higher education hub on the city side of the railway station stood central in Wittenborg’s long term policy plans.

The Spoorstraat building, is intended to house Wittenborg's developing research centre, its library and media facilities and will provide teaching facilities for its MBA and Master of Science degree programmes

The number of new students at Wittenborg is estimated to grow by 15% annually, currently comprising of almost 400 from about 60 different nationalities. The expansion of the university’s campus is in line with its ambitious plans to develop new programs at a high rate over the next few years. Last year its new MBA program was accredited and this year it will introduce a host of new Bachelor programs, including a uniquely structured IBA in Technology.

 Wittenborg’s new campus will be part of a new concentration of higher education in the city of Apeldoorn. It is situated next to the recently accredited University of Applied Sciences for Photography, known in Dutch as the Fotovak School (Photography Academy), and near the site on which the new Saxion University campus will be built.

Head of the Wittenborg Business School, Abdul Rauf comments, "Although we will have to get used to opening and closing a building ourselves, a great advantage of owning our own 'front door' is that we can have more variable opening and closing times, especially in weekends. For instance, it’s planned to run some of the MBA modules at weekends, and into the evenings".

Wittenborg will also fully remain in its current location, where its Bachelor programmes will be taught, however Bachelor students will regularly experience the Spoorstraat location, as the examinations will be held there in the new multi-functional hall on the second floor. The walking distance between the two locations, Aventus building and Spoorstraat Building is about 5 minutes and both are only 2 minutes from the central railway station.

Director Maggie Feng said: “The Spoorstraat building needs a full renovation and a complete overhaul to make it modern on the inside, whilst retaining its classic, school building character on the outside. We are aiming to establish 3 teaching rooms on the ground floor and convert the existing 3 of the 4 upstairs classrooms into a large multi-functional hall with a moveable wall. One of the rooms will become the library and research area.

"We expect the renovation and modernization process to be complete in late spring and are looking forward to a grand opening party sometime around June" she adds.

Wittenborg’s research centre recently got a huge boost by securing a stake in the EU-funded GREAT-project (Growing Renewable Energy Applications and Technologies) which aims to encourage communities as well as small to medium size enterprises (SME’s) to develop technological solutions for Smart Grid, Renewable Energy and Distributive Generation. It also promotes research and develop policy issues for regulatory authorities and provide structured co-operation opportunities between SMEs, research institutes and technology developers.

In this project, Wittenborg University is developing economic tools to inform and encourage SME’s to get further engaged in the use of green energy, stimulating investment in human capital, essential for the regional and national economy.

WUP 29/1/2015

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

 

Related Content: ApeldoornStudy in HollandMBAMscBBATickerText: Wittenborg to expand its campus this summer in line with rapid growth – Staff Visit the New Building at the Spoorstraat!

Spoorstraat 23 - Wittenborg University expands to a new building, also near the railway station

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 13:19
Language English

WUP 23/1/2015 - Spoorstraat 23 - Wittenborg University expands to a new building, also near the railway station - In an announcement today, Wittenborg University showed off the artist impressions of what is to be its new research campus on the opposite side of the railway.

  PRESS RELEASE  (For Dutch / Nederlands - Please see this link)

WUP 23/1/2015 - Spoorstraat 23 - Wittenborg University expands to a new building, also near the railway station - In an announcement today, Wittenborg University showed off the artist impressions of what is to be its new research campus on the opposite side of the railway.

The Spoorstraat 23 was originally built in the 1920's as a junior school and, although not large at just over 800 square metres has an excellent, visible location overlooking the central bus station and clearly visible from the railway lines running into the central railway station.

 

Situated next to the recently accredited University of Applied Sciences for Photograpghy, known in Dutch as the Fotovak School, and near the site on which the new Saxion University campus will be built, Wittenborg has positioned itself in the centre of what will develop into Apeldoorn's higher education campus.

 

The Spoorstraat building, is intended to house Wittenborg's developing research centre, its library and media facilities and will provide teaching facilities for its MBA programmes and Master of Science degree programmes.

 

Head of the Wittenborg Business School, Abdul Rauf comments, "Although we will have to get used to opening and closing a building ourselves, a great advantage of owning our own 'front door' is that we can have more variable opening and closing times, especially in weekends. For instance, its planned to run some of the MBA modules at weekends, and into the evenings".

 

Wittenborg will also fully remain in its current location, where its Bachelor programmes will be taught, however Bachelor students will regularly experience the Spoorstraat location, as the examinations will be held there in the new multi-functional hall on the second floor. The walking distance between the two locations, Aventus building and Spoorstraat Building is about 5 minutes and both are only 2 minutes from the central railway station.

 

According to director Maggie Feng, "The Spoorstraat needs a full renovation and a complete overhaul to make it modern on the inside, whilst retaining its classic school building character on the outside. We are aiming to establish 3 teaching rooms on the ground floor and convert the existing 3 of the 4 upstairs classrooms into a large multi-functional hall with a moveable wall. One of the rooms will become the library and research area."

 

"We expect to start the renovation and modernization process now, in January 2015 and complete in April, looking forward to a grand opening party sometime around June" she adds

 

WUP 23/1/2015

 

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: ApeldoornStudy in HollandWittenborg CampusTickerText:  Spoorstraat 23 - Wittenborg University expands to a new building, also near the railway station

New loan system for Dutch students sails through parliament

Thu, 01/22/2015 - 20:04
Language English

From 1 September 2015 new Dutch and EU students who need financial assistance qualify for a study loan of up to €1 016 per month, with which they can pay their study fees. Wittenborg students pay around €525- a month in tuition fees, leaving €491- for housing and living expenses, generally topping up what they can earn with a part time job (around €500 a month).

From 1 September 2015 new Dutch and EU students who need financial assistance qualify for a study loan of up to €1 016 per month, in accordance with new rules for study financing in the Netherlands. Students can already start applying from 7 April 2015.

The Dutch education system is facing its biggest reform in decades: As per 1 September 2015 new Dutch Bachelor and Master students will no longer receive a basic grant from the government like in the past. Instead, those in dire straits will need to take out a loan – albeit with very lenient terms.

The controversial proposal for a new study finance system sailed through the Dutch parliament on Tuesday with a majority vote, despite widespread protests since it was announced last year. The Ministry of Higher Education reckons it can save up to €1 billion which will be re-invested in education.

 As an international institute Wittenborg University enrolls many students from the Netherlands as well as students from the EU/EEA and Switzerland in its Bachelor and Master programmes each year. The costs for a typical Bachelor programme at Wittenborg amounts to €6 500 per year, which translates to about €542 per month – well below the maximum amount Dutch and EU students are allowed to borrow under the new system.

Further good news is that those students who are already receiving the basic grant from the government will continue to get it until they finish their studies which means they will not have to take out a loan.

In addition, students from disadvantaged homes – where parents earn less than €46 000 per year - will receive a supplementary grant. Students whose parents earn less than €30 000 per annum will qualify for a supplementary grant of up to €378 euros per month which will be considered a gift should they graduate within 10 years. If not, they will get 15 – 35 years to repay the loan.

The first batch of students (2015-2016) who apply for a study loan will receive a voucher of €2 000 upon graduation which they can use for further education between 5 and 10 years after they graduated.

What are the terms for repayment?

Students will be able to take a loan of maximum €1 016 per month (you determine the amount yourself according to your fee and living expenses). Repayments must be done within a period of 15 to 35 years. Students are also entitled to only start with the repayments once they start earning more than the minimum salary (currently just less than €1 500 per month).

If you are an international student from the EU/EEA/Switzerland

If you have the nationality of an EU/EEA-country or Switzerland, you qualify for student finance if you have been living in the Netherlands for 5 consecutive years or more. Or if you (or your non-Dutch parent or partner) are working in the Netherlands for at least 56 hours per month.

An official from the DUO told Wittenborg News yesterday that EU/EEA/Swiss students have the same rights as Dutch students pertaining to student financing provided they adhere to the conditions above.

You do not have the nationality of an EU/EEA-country or Switzerland? Then you still qualify for student finance if you have a residence permit type II, III or IV.

The repayment period of your student debt starts on 1 January following the expiration of your right to a student grant. First you have a preliminary phase, lasting 2 years. During that time you are not required to make repayments, although it is possible. After the preliminary phase, the repayment phase (up to 15 years) starts. During this phase you have to repay your debt. Interest is charged during both the preliminary phase and the repayment phase.

Source: https://duo.nl/particulieren/studievoorschot/default.asp

WUP 22/1/2015

©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

Related Content: Grants & LoansMBAMscBBATickerText: New loan system for Dutch students sails through parliament

Wittenborg lecturer Teun Wolters' Working Paper series elicits lively debate among colleagues

Tue, 01/20/2015 - 17:00
Language English

This week Wittenborg University’s applied research professor in corporate sustainability, dr Teun Wolters, presented the first of a Working Paper series.

As he explains, having Working Papers – which presents initial research outcomes and new ideas for further research – is common procedure in universities.

 “In other words, it gives researchers the opportunity to present their first ideas. It is part of the so-called ‘grey literature’ which can be developed later into fully-fledged journal articles.”

Wolters presented the work to peers and colleagues at a special event on Monday. The paper reports on a research project executed last year in the Dutch health care sector involving a care organization in Apeldoorn, the city where Wittenborg is located.

“The organization is undergoing a major transition as a result of external changes in Dutch long-term care policies,” Wolters says in his summary to the paper. “Wittenborg was asked to execute research to measure and interpret the ability and willingness of the organisation to turn the formulated vision on the needed change and new direction into reality. This year there will be follow-up research, which can be done now that the new organisational structure is clear and is being tried out.”

According to Wolters one of the main objectives of the presentation is to promote the idea of doing working papers and applied research among other researchers at Wittenborg. Also to present his approach – one which includes low budget projects that makes sense, both academically and practically  “…as an example to colleagues encouraging them to also produce something – whether alone or in collaboration with others. For instance, they can use their own experience and knowledge to write 30 or 40 pages as a proposal for research which can perhaps lead to some sort of project.”

What are the benefits for a university like Wittenborg to get involved with research projects like this? “If you want to develop yourself towards a full-fledged university, research is a basic thing,” Wolters says matter-of-factly.

Wittenborg actively promotes the services of its Research Centre to the public and private sector. However, Wolters – who has more than 30 years experience as a researcher – cautions that a balance must be struck. “You must build up your own identity and must take care not to rely too much on outsiders. Collaboration is always important in research but you must also build up your own identity so that you are not just seen as an agent. The community should know what it can expect of you.”

Wolters’ presentation on Monday led to a lively discussion among his audience. Wittenborg director, Peter Birdsall, sees a working paper as a possible stepping stone in researching the impact of foreign students on a national scale within the context of internationalization in Dutch higher education.

The Head of Wittenborg Business School, Abdul Rauf, suggested Working Papers might be useful in identifying a stream for Wittenborg research.

How did the Working Paper come about? “I did active acquisition of it,” says Wolters. “I contacted one of the long term care organizations. But you see, it is not very easy to get access. We have no previous experience in the health sector and I tried in different ways. I met someone in Apeldoorn whom I knew from before and I told him my ideas. He is the chairman of the organizations’ Clients Council and since he thought it was interesting we formally brought it up in the organization. That led to the suggestion that I should do some research there.

“So, first of all we wanted to do something for the local community and the health sector in Apeldoorn is a big sector – many people are working there. Secondary, Wittenborg’s management has plans to set up a School for Health Care.”

Wolters says he hopes his presentation will spark some ideas. “In some instances new materials can be combined with final-year projects. The student can then be involved in the creation of the Working Paper, but I feel the main author should still be the lecturer.”

Currently he is working on a second paper - on change-management. “An external specialist who wrote quite a few books about the topic made a paper of 40 pages including ideas for research and I am translating it into English.”

WUP 20/1/2014

Download PDF: 

 "A turn in Dutch long-term care as organizational change" a Wittenborg University Working Paper 2014-1 by Dr Teun Wolters   ©Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

 

Related Content: Wittenborg Research CentreInternational Event Management MSc ProgrammeMSc International Hospitality ManagementTickerText: Wittenborg lecturer Teun Wolters' Working Paper series elicits lively debate among colleagues

The 2015 Wittenborg University Address

Sun, 01/18/2015 - 23:44
Language English

More than 70 staff and family enjoyed the annual Wittenborg New Year’s dinner on Friday, which included the traditional New Year’s “Address” by Chairman of the Board, Peter Birdsall, which looked back at the numerous achievements in 2014 and ahead to 2015.

After listing achievements such as the start of the GREAT research project, the MBA accreditation, and the visits of Prime Minister Mark Rutte in February and the subsequent visit of Jet Bussemaker, Minister of Education, Birdsall went on to praise Wittenborg’s back office staff and the admissions team for helping to make 2014, what he titled ‘the best year yet!”.

Looking forward, Birdsall unveiled a new second campus, ready to open in May 2014 and to be announced to students and staff later this week. He also hinted at a breakthrough in the creation of a new student housing complex in Apeldoorn.

On the education front, Wittenborg presented its plans to accredit a new Hospitality Management degree, as well as new Bachelor and Master degrees in Sport, Business and Management. September will also see the launch of a degrees in Business Administration and Technology Management, and a BBA in ICT Management – both aimed at students who want to gain as much work experience as possible.

WUP 17/1/2014

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Changes to income requirements for international students and workers in the Netherlands

Fri, 01/16/2015 - 14:38
Language English

WUP 15/1/2015 - Changes to income requirements for international students and workers in the Netherlands - New changes to the income criteria for international students wishing to Study in Holland and migrants wishing to work in the Netherlands have kicked in from the 1st of January 2015.

To be eligible for a stay permit in the Netherlands – whether for work or study – there are specific requirements pertaining to your level of income.  This is subject to change every six months.

The requirements for a stay permit include proof of sufficient income for a given period. “The amount is determined by your personal situation and the type of permit you request. “

Students

For purposes of study, applicants have to they have access to an amount of at least €854,13 per month for living expenses – this  excludes study fees.

2015

2014

2013

€854,13

€833,22

€813,29

Simplified residence permit

In June 2013 the Dutch government adopted the Modern Migration Policy Act, thereby simplifying the applying procedures for international students wanting to Study in Holland. One of the real benefits of the new legislation is that residence permits can be granted for longer periods, which means less renewal procedures.  In other words, students no longer need to apply for a residence every year of their studies. However the Immigration and Naturalization Service (IND) still holds the educational institution responsible for keeping the students’ file updated. 

After studies

New income criteria for the first half of 2015 also applies to students who graduated in The Netherlands and make use of the so-called “zoekjaar” (Search Year) which allows foreign students to stay up to a year in The Netherlands after their studies to look for a job. Though these graduates are under no monetary obligations during their zoekjaar (Search Year), if they wish to stay on once it expires, the government requires proof of sufficient income.

From 1 January 2015 this amount has been raised to €2 201,00 in gross salary excluding 8% holiday money.

2015

2014

€2 201,00 (€2 377,08, including 8% holiday payment)

€2 127,00 gross salary (€2 297,00 including 8% holiday payment)

 

For international knowledge migrants (so-called “kennismigrante”) who did not Study in Holland but wish to work here, the following changes has been made pertaining to income:

·         Migrants under 30 years must earn at least €3 071,00 per month in gross salary (excluding holiday payment of 8%).

·         Migrants older than 30 years must earn at least €4 189,00 per month in gross salary (excluding holiday payment of 8%).

Source: www.nuffic.nl

WUP 15/01/2015

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Dutch language skills not compulsory for international students

Sun, 01/11/2015 - 21:16
Language English

International students will not be obliged to follow a Dutch language course if they want to study in the Netherlands.

This assurance was recently given in parliament by the Dutch Minister of Higher Education, Jet Bussemaker, in response to  concerns raised by a member of the ruling party (VVD) that the current arrangement in terms of a basic language course for international students are too optional or non-binding.  Peter Duisenberg fears students’ inability to speak Dutch will seriously hamper their chances of finding a job after graduating if they wish to stay on in the Netherlands. 

However Bussemaker said government will launch an online game this summer which aims to teach students the basics of the language. Whether this is sufficient will be discussed with universities and other institutes of higher education.

The minister said she would like to see more international students master Dutch but making it compulsory might deter them from studying in the Netherlands at all. “One of the very reasons they come to the Netherlands is because we offer such a large supply of English-taught programmes.”

As of this year 768 foreign students will come to study in the Netherlands as a result of a new scholarship programme  announced by the Dutch government last year. Each will receive €5 000 towards their study fees in an effort to lure top international talent to the country. At the same time, as many Dutch students will receive a bursary of €1 250 to assist with their studies abroad.

Meanwhile, Duisenberg said too many international students don’t bother learning Dutch or neglect their language course when other subjects take priority. “We should not only invest in their studies, but also ensure they have the best chance possible to contribute to the Dutch economy,” according to Duisenberg.

 At the same time he is not convinced sanctions – such as expelling students who do not complete a basic Dutch language course – should be implemented. “Just make the current arrangement a bit more binding or present it to the student as an investment in a possible career in the Netherlands,” he advised the minister. "Only then can we speak of a win-win situation."

All Wittenborg’s international students are offered Dutch language courses, and Bachelor students can opt to take them as part of their foreign languages modules.

WUP 10/1/2015

Source: www.nuffic.nl

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New tool for international students about job opportunities

Wed, 01/07/2015 - 09:51
Language English

For international students wishing to make a career in The Netherlands after completing their studies here, some of the mysteries of the Dutch labour market has now been unraveled.

The Netherlands Organization for International Cooperation in Higher Education (Nuffic) has made extensive, new information available about work opportunities for internationals in the Netherlands on the website www.careerinholland.nl .

The portal provides new information on the key sectors, occupations in demand and the type of companies most likely to employ foreign workers. These include SME’s, multinationals, academia, government and NGO’s working in developing countries.

At Wittenborg University IBA students are prepared for the job market by doing a work placement at a company in the Netherlands as part of their final-phase studies.

Nuffic said on its website that apart from sector and regional differences, career opportunities in the Netherlands also vary depending on the type of company you are employed in. 

“Due to the high levels of education, technology and entrepreneurship, the Dutch knowledge-driven economy has a great demand for highly skilled young professionals. Globally, the Netherlands ranks 4th in the World Bank’s Knowledge Economic Index. Research shows that foreign knowledge workers are concentrated in big urban agglomerations and are more likely to work in foreign or internationally based firms.”

Prospective and current students can also do an online test to determine how ready they are for a career in The Netherlands.

The key sectors in the Dutch labor market are: 

  • Creative industries 
  • Logistics 
  • Chemical industry 
  • Energy 
  • Agriculture and Food 
  • Life Science and Health 
  • High tech systems and materials 
  • Horticulture 
  • Water 

Nuffic concluded that on the whole the Netherlands is an attractive place to work, considering the relatively high wages and pleasant working conditions. Nuffic expanded and updated the information on these topics to convince more international students to consider a career in Holland, after their Study in Holland!

Source: www.nuffic.nl

WUP7/1/2015

Related Content: Study in HollandWork PlacementTickerText: New tool for international students about job opportunities

Wittenborg University students visit manufacturing company in Deventer as part of their 3rd project week

Sat, 12/20/2014 - 00:01
Language English

This week, a group of around 50 international students representing more than 40 nationalities, were given a tour the Smurfit Kappa factory in the nearby town of Deventer. This global company welcomed Wittenborg’s students with a tour and some lectures about the company and its sustainability policies.

Smurfit Kappa Zedek in Deventer employs around 250 staff and produces high quality, full colour printed cardboard displays and packaging.

The factory is part of one of the world’s most prestigious producers of paper-based packaging, and employs around 41,000 people worldwide at over 350 factories in 32 different countries. Its yearly turnover was almost 8 billion euro in 2013.

During the visit, students were also given a lecture on the company’s history, activities and future prognosis, as well as an additional lecture on the issues of sustainability that concern the organization and sustainable practices carried out by Smurfit Kappa.

WUP 19/12/2014

Related Content: Project WeeksMBABBAMscTickerText: Wittenborg University students visit manufacturing company in Deventer as part of their 3rd project week

Wittenborg Alumni represented at a Neso event for Alumni of Dutch Universities, held in Ho Chi Minh City last Friday

Wed, 12/17/2014 - 15:24
Language English

Wittenborg University was represented by its former students Ben Visser and Miss Tran Minh at a meeting of Alumni who had studied in Holland.

The event, held by representatives of the Dutch Neso offices, now merged with the Dutch embassy due to recent austerity cuts, was co-hosted by Wittenborg's visiting lecturer Mr Loek Hopstaken.

Mr Hopstaken is based in Vietnam, however visits the Netherlands, and Wittenborg regularly, and often represents Wittenborg University in Vietnam.

Dutch graduate Ben Visser has lived and worked in Vietnam since graduating from the Bachelor of International Business Administration in 2012.

WUP 16/12/2014

© Wittenborg University Press

 

Related Content: AlumniMBABBAMscTickerText: Wittenborg Alumni represented at a Neso event for Alumni of Dutch Universities, held in Ho Chi Minh City last Friday

Wittenborg Alumnus Lasantha de Silva Continues Distinguishing Career in Sri Lanka

Sun, 12/14/2014 - 22:09
Language English

Alumni from Wittenborg University who have carved out brilliant careers for themselves can be found all over the world. A case in point is Lasantha de Silva who graduated at the top of his class in 2008 and is now serving as Director Higher Studies at one of the largest private education institutes in Sri Lanka. Anesca Smith talks to Lasantha about his time at Wittenborg and his experiences since graduation.

Before studying at Wittenborg University Lasantha worked in the Middle East banking sector and after graduation became Wittenborg’s first Education Operations Manager after starting as a junior lecturer.  In an interview he explains what value studying at an international university added to the quality of his education and what ambitions he still has for himself.

Lasantha, what made you decide to study abroad?

Before migrating to the Netherlands, I was an expatriate in the Middle-East Baking sector. The exposure I could gather in Europe, one of the promising economies in the world, especially being born to a traditional Sri Lankan family, was understood to be enormous. Thus, foreign education was sought.

Why did you choose Wittenborg?

When seeking a degree in finance, a small university in the Netherlands caught my eye. The friendly approach when I was a prospective student, the spontaneous support and the specialization attracted me to Wittenborg.

Which degree did you earn?

International Business Administration specializing in Financial Services Management with Honours (GPA 8.0/10.0)

How did your study and career path develop since graduating from Wittenborg?

Upon my graduation I was offered to stay at Wittenborg and start my career as a junior lecturer. At this juncture, it was a crucial decision to make, having over 6 years of work experience in the finance sector. The decision of accepting the offer made by Peter Birdsall and Maggie Feng (Wittenborg Directors), not only made me change my career from Finance to Education, but also transformed me into a different person. When I left the Netherlands after 5 very productive years, I was the Education Operations Manager in addition to lecturing at Wittenborg. With the kind guidance and support of my “gurus” in the stream of Education, Peter and Maggie, I have now fledged myself to a complete individual, serving in one of the largest private education institutions in tertiary education in Sri Lanka, as the Director Higher Studies.  Currently I’m conducting the research study of my Master programme; Master of Arts in Leadership, Innovation and Change Management from University of York St. John, the United Kingdom.

Where do you stay now?

I currently reside in Sri Lanka with my family.

What about work?

At present, I am the Director Higher Studies of Royal Institute of Colombo, one of the largest private institutes offering tertiary education to Sri Lankan youth. Having founded in 1970, Royal Institute (Pvt) Ltd houses over 5 000 students and offers education from kindergarten to postgraduate studies.  Royal institute of Colombo, the Higher Education arm of RI, is the ONLY “Affiliate Centre” for University of London (UoL) International programmes in Sri Lanka. The academic direction to the UoL programmes is provided by leading business schools in the UK; London School of Economics (LSE), University College London (UCL), Queen Mary University (QMU), King’s College, Birkbeck.

RIC offers degrees in the fields of Economics, Management, Finance, Sociology, International Relations and Law from UoL and also in Engineering, Biomedical-sciences and IT through a pathway programme of Deakin University Australia. To the side of heading the tertiary education division of Royal Institute, I am also a senior lecturer for the LSE-led programmes in Sri Lanka in the stream of Banking and Finance for undergraduate students.

What has been the extent of your involvement with Wittenborg since you graduated?

Since I left Wittenborg for Sri Lanka in 2012 I have kept in close contact with my ex-colleagues.

Do you think it is important to be involved, or at the very least, keep some contact with one’s alma mater after graduation?

One should never forget who they are and what made him or her the person who they are now. Gratitude is one very important trait a person should possess.

Would you be interested in joining a formal alumni association from Wittenborg?

Of course, it would be my greatest pleasure.

If so, what would you expect from such an organization?

Networking

What are some of your fondest memories from studying at Wittenborg?

·         Obtaining the highest grades for all modules offered

·         Re-initiating the Students’ Union in 2007 and being elected as the President of the Students’ Union 2007

·         Getting Graduated topping the batch with a classification of First Class Honours

 

Would you be interested in being to some sort of service to current students? If so, in which capacity?

Guest lecturing

What did studying at an internationally-orientated university mean to you? For instance, do you think it added value to the quality of education you received?

The International exposure, interpersonal and inter-cultural skills developed, networking with classmates and the expertise brought in to the classroom by the foreign lecturers extended the experiences gained beyond the borders of Main Land Europe, thus added value to my education and of course to my career advancement.

Related to that, how would you describe your study experience as a whole at Wittenborg?

Compared to many Universities, Wittenborg is small with regard to student numbers. For me, that is one of the distinctive features of Wittenborg: The individual attention given to students both academically and informally (through the tutor groups) ensured the students were provided with extended support.

One unique practice at Wittenbrog was the guest lectures delivered by industry experts, sharing their experiences with the students showing them how the theories learnt in the classrooms are practiced in the real world. The seminar papers also gave us a hint of what is academic writing and prepared us for the final research study and the thesis.

Would you recommend the Netherlands and Wittenborg as a study destination?

Wittenborg provides students, especially foreign students, a homely environment. Creating a comforting, family atmosphere is a unique feature at Wittenborg - from the top management, lecturers to the administrative staff and the students are given the feeling that they are taken care of. Academically, the educational experience is distinctive. The examination tools used enhance different skills in students which prepare them for advanced working cultures.

What were some of the challenges you faced as a student?

Having been brought-up in Sri Lanka, and not being one of the most out-going students during my secondary education, public speaking was a nightmare for me. Exam C component, the presentations in each module, was definitely a challenge I faced during the early months. Better preparation and frequent practice made me overcome the phobia of public speaking and presentation. Thanks to Wittenborg, I now address audiences of thousands and also deliver training sessions to large groups of professionals without any hesitation.

Did you work while you were studying? If so, where and for what period?

I completed thee internships: one at Wittenborg as the Education Assistant from September 2007 till November 2007; second, at Amsterdam Institute of Finance as Assistant to the Associate Director from December 2007 till April 2008 and third, once again at Wittenborg from May 2008 till July 2008.

Would you recommend doing an internship as part of the study experience?

Doing an internship during study period, in my purview is very important. Students will not only get the opportunity to experience different theories discussed in the class rooms, but also encourages innovation in student minds, maturity and  improves interpersonal skills.

What advice would you give new graduates wishing to enter the job market based on your own experience?

The right commitment, pro-activeness and attitude define one’s growth and it has no limits.

What short and long term ambitions do you have for yourself career wise?

Since I serve in the field of Education, I wish to read for my PhD. My current research is to improve the education system in Sri Lanka. Finally, I want to develop my own baccalaureate.

WUP 14/14/2014

Link: http://www.wittenborg.eu/wittenborg-university-says-fond-farewell-education-manager-lasantha-de-silva.htm 

Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

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Joining Wittenborg's Alumni Network - why it should matter to you!

Sun, 12/14/2014 - 21:53
Language English

WUP 12/12/2014 - Joining Wittenborg's Alumni Network - why it should matter to you! Today Wittenborg published its first Alumni Newsletter, planned as a quarterly and is reaching out to all the students who have graduated since Wittenborg University (formally Hogeschool Wittenborg) went "International" in 2003!

Wittenborg University will be doubling its efforts in 2015 to create an active Alumni Network!

First, we would like to know how your experience and education at Wittenborg served your long and short term ambitions and are also curious about your current status and career development.

Therefore we would like to urge all our former students to make contact with the university by emailing alumninetwork@wittenborg.eu . We would also like to encourage you to complete our Alumni Survey which you will find here.

It is very easy to lose track of most graduates after they embark on their various career paths - even more so if they studied at an institute like Wittenborg with its international student base! We do however believe alumni have much to gain from actively staying in touch with their alma mater and they also have much to offer current students.

Why your participation matters

·         An active Alumni Network can serve as a platform for potential business relations to interact.

·         Alumni can act as role models for current students. Not only do they inspire but also encourage present students to stay involved with the university after graduation.

·         The Netherlands is serious about retaining international talent for its economy. Therefore, detailed information on international graduates from Dutch institutes are sorely needed.

·         Interacting with alumni and gaining their insight helps to ensure continued excellence at Wittenborg University.

·         A loyal base of alumni suggests a university has much to offer, thereby boosting its reputation and support in the private and public sector.

Please note: All Alumni of Wittenborg University are offered a significant scholarships to its Master degree programmes. Contact us for details!

What has changed since you graduated?

In 2008 Wittenborg directors, Peter Birdsall and Maggie Feng, officially became the management board at Hogeschool Wittenborg, Deventer.
 
The Bachelor in International Business Administration was accredited in 2006 by the NVAO. Up until that point, all Wittenborg courses were offered in Dutch. In 2007 the university started its first English IBA programmes.

In May 2008 the name of the school changed from Hogeschool Wittenborg to Wittenborg Business School to attract more international students.

In 2010 Wittenborg left Deventer and moved to Apeldoorn where it continues to share a state-of-the-art building with ROC Aventus. Since the move to Apeldoorn Wittenborg’s international profile has grown significantly. In 2012 the Bachelor (IBA) was re-accredited by the NVAO.


To fit its international character, the name of the school was changed again in 2012 - from Wittenborg Business School to Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences.

 As part of its long-term goal, the management board has designed a 10-year plan which will see Wittenborg divide into 5 centrally managed schools. These are:

1.       School of Business

2.       School of Hospitality & Tourism

3.       School of Arts & Technology

4.       School of Health & Social Care

5.       School of Education

All 5 schools will have at least one Broad Bachelor course and one Master degree course. In this respect Wittenborg strives to become the first private, international institute in the Netherlands with broad degrees.

In the past four years Wittenborg University has reached many milestones which it is proud of:

It has established a strong partnership with the University of Brighton in the UK, including three joint Master of Science programmes: the MSc in International Event Management, the MSc in International Hospitality Management and the MSc in International Tourism Management.

It has also partnered in creating the so-called EuroBA – a Bachelor of Arts in International Hospitality Management – which sees students studying in four different countries over a 3-year period: The Netherlands, Germany, France and the UK.
 
Wittenborg latest accomplishment is the accreditation of its Master of Business Administration (MBA) programme – due to start in February 2015 - by the German accreditation body, FIBAA.  The MBA programme has three specializations: Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Hospitality Management and General Management.

Though Wittenborg has a strong international orientation, it also works closely with private companies and public institutes in the Netherlands, including organizations in the Apeldoorn region and Gelderland Province. Its motto “Think Global and Act Local” has become more relevant than ever.

WUP 10/12/2014

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Master of Science Students Enjoy a Christmas High Tea

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 22:48
Language English

Wittenborg University Master of Science students were joined by their tutors, Esther, Karin and Rauf, front office manager Eva and Director of Education Peter Birdsall for a High Tea in one of Apedoorn's central coffee and tea houses.

The event marked the end of the 2014 lesson timetable - with only a week to go before then Christmas break! The theme was tea, cakes and sandwiches - many cakes and sandwiches : -)

See facebook: Master of Science Students enjoy a Christmas High Tea (23 photos)

WUP 11/12/2014

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Interview with Wittenborg Lecturer Emiel Schiphorst and his tips for growing a company

Wed, 12/10/2014 - 21:42
Language English

WUP 10/12/2014 -Anesca Smith - Interview with Wittenborg Lecturer Emiel Schiphorst and his tips for growing a company - What distinguishes Wittenborg University staff are not only their diverse cultures, but also the fact that all boast impressive academic backgrounds and range of skill. One of them is marketing professional, Emiel Schiphorst, who is an entrepreneur, author and Qualified Examiner for the Dutch Institute for Marketing (NIMA). Wittenborg recently signed an agreement with NIMA to become one of its education partners.

Emiel has over 12 years’ experience in Marketing, Sales and New Product Development.  He studied Economics and Management Science and obtained an International Executive MBA in France and the US. He has been lecturing part-time at Wittenborg since mid-2013 and teaches International Marketing for SME's and Process Management.  In an interview he gave tips on how to grow your own business and also tells us what inspires him.    How would you describe the experience of teaching at Wittenborg so far?

Teaching feels like being a "family member". We consist of a small team, there are short lines in communication and the students are willing to grow and learn, which is very powerful.

What is fulfilling about teaching international students?

International students are more "interested" to realize their targets. They are more willing to learn from you as a practical teacher rather than from textbooks and theory. Many students have contacted me over LinkedIn, WhatsApp, Facebook and so on. They know how important networking is. I also receive many questions about entrepreneurship from students who are struggling with problems in starting their own business. 

Being a Dutch national, what advice do you have for international students on adapting to life in the Netherlands?

Read books and articles about Dutch companies such as Heineken, Shell, Blokker and Hema that managed to be very successful despite being from a small country. You should also read up about the Dutch royal family, visit Amsterdam and Keukenhof in Lisse with its many beautifull fowers to understand our culture.  Then, you can speak English and German to us, but if you know a few words in Dutch that would be very appreciated. If it's possible, also try and spend some time with a Dutch family to experience our "stampot met worst".

Who or what inspires you?

Two things. First, new products. I always wonder why we develop new things when there is not always a customer need. Secondly, I am inspired by family-run companies  because of their remarkable culture - companies started by the likes of  Ingvar Kamprad (IKEA), Jaap Blokker, Freddy Heineken and Rudolf Dassler (Adidas and Puma). I worked for more than six years for a huge, international pharmaceutical company run by a famous family - it can be the best learning school ever if you do a good job.

What tips do you have for growing a business?

You always need 3 things in your company to grow: New products, new products, new products. This was proven by scientific research. 

 Name one interesting thing most people don't know about you.

I like the German language, Germany culture and especially the music of SCOOTER (www.scootertechno.com)

Finally, why were you interested in lecturing  at Wittenborg University?

The international evironment, the motivation of students and staff as well as my internal drive. There is a moment in life where you want to give back some of your own experience to eager, young students. 

WUP 10/12/2014

Wittenborg University Press

by Anesca Smith

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New Dutch Student Loans System to Start in 2015

Fri, 12/05/2014 - 23:30
Language English

WUP 05/12/2014 - New Dutch Student Loans System to Start in 2015 - Despite continued protests, it’s becoming evident that new Dutch students starting with their bachelor or master studies in September 2015 will most likely not receive a basic grant from the Dutch government like it was done in the past.

However, the good news is that they - along with students from the EU/EEA and Switzerland - will still be eligible for a study loan from the department of education (DUO) with lenient repayment terms. The loan can cover their full study fee as well as maintenance costs – even when they choose to study at a private, but fully accredited university, like Wittenborg University.

The majority of parties in the Dutch government’s Tweede Kamer (House of Representatives) this week voted for the abolition of the basic grant for students and the introduction of a new loan system.

The last hurdle in pushing through the legislation will be getting the Eerste Kamer (First House) to approve the changes, but it is unlikely that the majority of parties will vote against it. The Dutch minister of education, culture and science, Jet Bussemaker, has urged members of the house for a speedy process. The bill has already been adapted several times with concessions such as a lowering of the minimum amount former students has to repay monthly should they take a loan as well as having access to financing from the first day of study.
How does the new student financing work?

As of 1 September 2015 the basic grant will no longer be available to students who are starting their studies, whether on bachelor or master level. Instead, students will be able to take a loan from about 980 euros maximum per month (you determine the amount yourself according to your fee and living expenses). Repayments must be done within a period of 15 to 35 years. Students are also entitled to only start with the repayments once they start earning more than the minimum salary.

Students from disadvantaged homes, will receive a supplementary grant of 365 euros per month which will be considered a gift should they graduate within 10 years. If not, they will get 15 – 35 years to repay the loan.
 
Students who are already receiving the basic grant will continue receiving it for the duration of their studies.

If you are an international student from the EU/EEA/Switzerland

If you have the nationality of an EU/EEA-country or Switzerland, you qualify for student finance if you have been living in the Netherlands for 5 consecutive years or more. Or if you (or your non-Dutch parent or partner) are working in the Netherlands for at least 56 hours per month.

Do you not have the nationality of an EU/EEA-country or Switzerland? Then you still qualify for student finance if you have a residence permit type II, III or IV. Check the nationality chart below if you have another type of permit.

The repayment period of your student debt starts on 1 January following the expiration of your right to a student grant. First you have a preliminary phase, lasting 2 years. During that time you are not required to make repayments, although it is possible. After the preliminary phase, the repayment phase (up to 15 years) starts. During this phase you have to repay your debt. Interest is charged during both the preliminary phase and the repayment phase.

DUO will calculate a relevant monthly installment which should enable you to repay the loan in full within 15 years. The monthly instalment depends on the amount of student debt you owe and the interest. The minimum amount is €45.41 per month.

If you have difficulty paying the monthly instalment DUO has set for you, you can submit a request to have it reduced. We will then use your income from 2 years ago to calculate how much you can afford to repay. Or you can ask DUO to temporarily stop collecting your study debt (for a maximum of 5 years).

Source: https://duo.nl/particulieren/

WUP 05/12/2014

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Calling all Vietnamese alumni who studied in the Netherlands!

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 23:41
Language English

WUP 01/12/2014 - Networking Event for Vietnamese Alumni! -

Calling all Vietnamese alumni who studied in the Netherlands! 

Next Friday, on 12 December 2014, the Dutch Consulate General in Vietnam and NUFFIC is co-hosting a professional networking event for the Dutch business community in Ho Chi Minh City and Vietnamese alumni who studied in the Netherlands. In the 2012-13 academic year there were almost 400 Vietnamese students studying in the Netherlands.

At Wittenborg University, there have been a number of notable graduates from Vietnam during the past 10 years. In fact, the university's top student from 2013, Min Tran, was Vietnamese.  According to Wittenborg's registrar, Santosh Aryal, there are currently 7 students from Vietnam studying at the university of which the majority hail from Ho Chi Minh City.

The aim of the event is to provide a platform for those wishing to expand their Dutch and Vietnamese business network and to stimulate contact between alumni who studied in the Netherlands. The  event follows a workshop for alumni with at least 4 years of work experience that was held recently.

The guest speaker for next week's event is Mr Loek Hopstaken who has in the past guest-lectured at Wittenborg University.  For the last seven years Mr Hopstaken has worked extensively with Vietnamese companies - both private and state-owned - as well as a number of non-Asian multinationals operating in Vietnam. In the Netherlands he worked for Postbank and ING Bank. He has also conducted training for companies such Damen Shipyards, Philips and Heineken.

A welcome speech will also be given by the Dutch Consul General in Vietnam and a representative from Nuffic's Neso in Vietnam.

A year ago, faced with severe budgetary cuts, NUFFIC announced it will close three of its worldwide Neso’s (Netherlands Education Support Offices), including Vietnam, Thailand and Taiwan. However, in May the Vietnam office was given a lifeline and it was decided that from then on the Vietnam Neso will operate from the Dutch Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City.

The event will be held on 12 December 2014 at 16:00 at the Liberty Central Riverside, 17 Ton Duc Thang, D1, Ho Chi Minh City.

Those who wish to attend can register by sending an email to HCM@minbuza.nl. Thereafter a personal invitation will be sent. 

WUP 01/12/2014

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3 new IBA Bachelor specializations in Event Management, International Tourism and Sport Business & Management.

Mon, 12/01/2014 - 21:20
Language English

From September 2015, students will be able to choose from 3 new specialisations in the IBA Bachelor programme. Event Management and Tourism are already offered at Master, in a joint programme with the University of Brighton, that leads to the UK Master of Science award. IBA Sport Business & Management will look at both the commercial aspects of sports events, however also lay the link between sport and health, and sport promoting health - an issue that insurance companies are increasingly interested in!

Wittenborg's Bachelor of International Business Administration is a unique programme concept that offers a BBA Bachelor pathway that starts broad, then becomes more specialized. It allows most students to decide their Bachelor specialisation in phase (year) 2 and results in fewer students drop out due to having chosen the wrong field of study, at least in terms of business and management! One of the current exceptions is the IBA Hospitality Management which is developing its own pathway, including two work placement periods instead of the normal single one in year 3.

Wittenborg’s British-style higher education in Holland, means that three of the new IBA specializations can allow students to do a University of Brighton top-up programmes and a double degree. All three programmes will also allow students direct entry into the Master of Science programmes - MSc International Event Management, International Tourism Management, International Hospitality Management.

Every IBA programmes has a set of core modules in the key areas of Management and Organizations, Accounting & Finance, Marketing, Communication & information Management, Business Law, and Personal Development. Accompanying these modules, project weeks, work placement and the final project are the series of modules that a student follows within their own chosen Bachelor IBA specialisation.

The new IBA in Event Management will include Bachelor modules in areas such as:

The Event Industry, The Event Consumer Experience, Event Operations and Project Planning, Risk and Crisis Management in the International Events Industry, International Event Management Challenges, and Event Experience Design.

The new IBA in International Tourism will include Bachelor modules in areas such as:

The Travel and Tourism Industry, Impacts of Tourism, Resort and Designation Management, Tourism, Society and Culture, Tourism Management in Action, Transport, Travel and Mobility.. and Travelism: Contemporary Global Issues in Travel and Tourism

The new IBA in Sport Business & Management will include Bachelor modules in areas such as:

  • Sport Business Management
  • Sport Policy in Government and Business
  • Sport Consumers and B-to-B
  • Sport Economics & Society
  • Sport Business & Marketing
  • Strategic Change in Sport Business Management
  • International Sport Law & Regulations
  • Sports Events Design
  • Critical Issues in Sport and Leisure
  • Community Sport Development
  • Business Morality: Ethics and society
  • Sport Tourism
  • Sport in Healthcare Policy

WUP 01/12/2014 

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